Crop Management Topics

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  • 4. Have ag prices recovered from COVID?: An ag market outlook for 2021 (1 CM)

    Chad Hart, professor and extension economist, Economics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Thursday, December 3, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    We'll explore the twists and turns within the ag markets in 2020, COVID-19, the "Phase 1" trade deal, and the drought and derecho. We'll also examine what those factors indicate for 2021 and what new items we should pay attention to in the coming year.

  • 5. 2020 Cropping year in review: Soil moisture and crop yields (1 CM)

    Sotirios Archontoulis, associate professor, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Tuesday, December 8, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    This session will explain reasons for high and low yields in different locations and benchmark the 2020 cropping year with past years. It will also provide an evaluation of the current soil status, such as soil moisture levels, nitrogen and residue, and discuss the implications for 2021.

  • 12. Using cover crops as a forage resource (1 CM)

    Erika Lundy, extension beef field specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Greenfield, IA; Denise Schwab, extension beef field specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Vinton, IA; Chris Clark, extension beef field specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Chariton, IA
    Thursday, December 17, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    Integration of cover crops into the farming enterprise has been on the rise, providing both soil protection as well as a feed resource for beef cattle. However, grazing covers often conflicts with normal row crop management objectives. This presentation will address management strategies to make the most effective and economical use of cover crops as a forage resource.

  • 20. Tractor and central-fill planter tire inflation pressure effects on corn yield and soil physical properties (1 CM)

    Mehari Tekeste, assistant professor, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Thursday, December 31, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    Over the past decade, the agricultural farm equipment keeps getting bigger in size along with the concerns on soil compaction from excessive loading on compactable soil conditions. Issues related to soil compaction and its impact on crop yield from center rows and wing rows from central- fill planter equipment have been of concern to crop growers. Recently newer tire technologies, such as Central Tire Inflation System (CTIS) and IF/VF Radial Tire Pressure, have been introduced on tractor tires and row-crop planter tires as alternative solutions to Standard Radial Tire Pressure setting for increasing ground contact area and minimize yield impact from soil compaction. The session will show crop yield and soil property differences when comparing Central Tire Inflation System and IF/VF tires with standard radial tires on a MFWD tractor and 24-row central fill planter.

  • 23. Four ways to help wildlife on every farm (1 CM)

    Adam Janke, assistant professor and extension wildlife specialist, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Wednesday, January 6, 2021 at 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM CST
    Wildlife are everywhere on Iowa's landscapes and for many, their company enriches our daily experience from end rows to tree stands to back-porch feeders! In this presentation, Dr. Adam Janke will present on the basics of wildlife habitat and present four ways every farmer or landowner can improve conditions for wildlife and wildlife habitat on every farm.

  • 24. Best practices for interpreting yield monitor data (1 CM)

    Matt Darr, professor, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Thursday, January 7, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    This presentation will focus on best practices for interpreting combine yield monitor data. Research on yield data confidence and minimal reliable yield data area will be emphasized. The information presented will be valuable for creating crop management plans and evaluating the yield impact of crop input decisions.

  • 31. A review of Iowa's first year growing hemp: Permits, growing and harvest (1 CM)

    Robin Pruisner, state entomologist and ag security coordinator, Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship, Ankeny, IA; Angela Rieck-Hinz, Extension field agronomist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach
    Wednesday, January 20, 2021 at 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM CST
    2020 was the first year Iowans were allowed to grow hemp and with that came many challenges from both a regulatory and growing perspective. This talk will review the status of hemp permits in Iowa and will summarize data collected from Iowa hemp growers. A brief outlook for the 2021 hemp growing season will also be shared.

  • 32. Climate variability across Iowa and the science of seasonal predictability (1 CM)

    Justin Glisan, State Climatologist of Iowa, Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship, Des Moines, IA
    Thursday, January 21, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    The climate system is complex and has many features that impact short-term forecasts and long-term outlooks. The webinar will highlight dominate climate signals that impact Iowa along with a discussion of seasonal predictability and what can be expected in 2021.

  • 36. Drought tolerance in corn hybrids is affected by timing of drought stress initiation (1 CM)

    Jeff Coulter, professor and extension specialist of corn- based cropping systems, Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN
    Thursday, January 28, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    In the upper Midwest, moderate drought stress often occurs during the mid- to late reproductive stages of corn, and sometimes occurs during pollination. The availability of drought-tolerant hybrids, increasing corn acres under irrigation, and variable-rate technology provide many growers with new opportunities to mitigate drought stress in corn. This session will help participants better understand corn hybrid response to moderate drought stress, enabling improved agronomic decisions when dry growing conditions are anticipated or when irrigation water is in limited supply.

  • 40. Quality of 2020 Iowa corn and soybeans after drought and derecho (1 CM)

    Charles Hurburgh, professor, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering and professor in charge, Iowa Grain Quality Initiative, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Erin Bowers, affiliate assistant professor; Emily Branstad, graduate research assistant, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University
    Thursday, February 4, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    The 2020 crop started out with all indicators as favorable as most can remember. Starting in June, severe drought and then a massive windstorm caused significant deterioration of both yield and quality by harvest. We will summarize the events, their impacts, and the issues created for storage and processing through the 2020 marketing year. Recommendations for managing both the quality and the food/feed safety issues will be given.

  • 53. 2020 Northwest Iowa on-farm and research farm results (1 CM)

    Joel DeJong, extension field agronomist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Le Mars, IA; Andrew Weaver, Ag Specialist, NW Research Farm
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    This session will review the results from several on-farm projects conducted in northwest Iowa during 2020, plus a summary of some multi-year projects. Additionally, data from some projects being conducted at the Northwest Research Farm will also be shared.

  • 55. Redefining the field edge: Dealing with unprofitable acres (1 CM)

    Mark Licht, assistant professor and extension cropping systems specialist, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Adam Janke, assistant professor and Extension wildlife specialist, Iowa State University
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    Every farmer can tell you which acres are low producing, chances are those same field areas do not make a profit the majority of the time. This topic will talk about how within field profitability mapping can be used to determine field areas that may be better suited for non-row crop uses as well as what benefits may gained.

  • 57. Incorporating summer annual forages into the rotation (1 CM)

    Denise Schwab, extension beef field specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Vinton, IA; Chris Clark, extension beef field specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Chariton, IA; Erika Lundy, extension beef field specialist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Greenfield, IA
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    Summer annual forages can positively impact the grain and livestock farmer. Summer annuals provide needed feed either for grazing or for stored winter feed. But they also can benefit the grain farm by providing an additional crop in to the regular rotation. And they provide conservation benefits on marginal ground, especially when paired with winter annuals forages. Early results from ISU research trials will help show the benefits.

  • 58. Grain storage replacement decisions and planning (1 CM)

    Shawn Shouse, extension agricultural engineering field speicalist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Lewis, IA; Kapil Arora, Field Agricultural Engineer, ISU Extension and Outreach
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    Evaluating the choice between repairing and replacing damaged grain storage and handling equipment: points to consider and questions to ask. Planning for more efficient and convenient grain drying and storage facilities that meet your needs today and tomorrow.

  • 59. 2020 ISU On-farm demonstration trials results (1 CM)

    Mike Witt, extension field agronomist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Guthrie Center, IA
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    A look at the 2020 field trial results from the ISU On-farm Demonstration program. This includes local results from local farmers on current topics of interest across Iowa. Topics include soybean date of planting, AMS on soybeans, interseeding cover crops in corn, sulfur on alfalfa and many more.

  • 60. Iowa Pest Resistance Management Plan: Programs across Iowa (1 CM)

    Mike Witt, extension field agronomist, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Guthrie Center, IA; Steve Bradbury, Paul Lasley, Larry Buss
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    Iowa pest resistance management plan discussion on state wide programs. Focusing on weed herbicide resistance in Harrison and Story County, corn rootworm resistance issues in northeast Iowa and aoybean Aphid resistance in northwest Iowa. An overview of programs and data collected on community resistance management systems.