Pest Management Topics

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  • 1. Soybean pest updates (1 PM)

    Erin Hodgson, professor and extension entomologist, Entomology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Ashley Dean, extension entomologist, Iowa State University
    Tuesday, December 1, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    This presentation will provide an update on some of 2020's most important soybean insect pests. We will highlight research and management recommendations for soybean aphid, soybean gall midge, and Japanese beetle. Bring your questions and observations!

  • 8. Weed management update for 2021 (1 PM)

    Prashant Jha, associate professor and extension weed specialist, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Thursday, December 10, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    What's new in the weed management tool box? Research update on new herbicide products for weed control in corn and soybean, cover crop termination timing and soybean row spacing for weed suppression, and first on-farm testing of two new harvest weed control technologies-chaff lining and seed destructor in Iowa soybean.

  • 9. Stored grain insect biology and behavior affect control strategies (1 PM)

    Edmond Bonjour, associate extension specialist, stored products, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK
    Tuesday, December 15, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    Insects that infest stored grains have various biological needs and their behaviors are not all the same. This presentation will focus on how the biology and behavior of stored grain insects affect the success of various control strategies. It is critical to know what insect species you are trying to manage to effectively protect your stored product.

  • 13. Is an effective herbicide program enough? (1 PM)

    Bob Hartzler, professor and extension weed specialist, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Tuesday, December 22, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    Metabolism-based herbicide resistance has called into question the value of multiple effective sites of action in delaying herbicide resistance. Learn what we currently know about how we can best manage herbicides to protect their value.

  • 17. What's happening in corn disease research? (1 PM)

    Alison Robertson, professor and extension crop plant pathologist, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Tuesday, December 29, 2020 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    This presentation will share results from on-going research in the Robertson Lab. In 2020 we had trials that evaluated the impact of cover crops on seedling disease and corn growth and development, in addition to fungicide trials for Physoderma and foliar disease control.

  • 21. 2020 Soybean disease update (1 PM)

    Daren Mueller, associate professor and extension crop plant pathologist, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Tuesday, January 5, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    The dry weather across much of the state slowed (or stopped) disease progression in soybean fields. However, the Mueller lab still has some updates on research related to soybean diseases. I will summarize some of the key research findings on soybean disease management.

  • 25. Update on spray nozzle technology (1 PM)

    Ryan Bergman, program specialist, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Tuesday, January 12, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    This session will briefly discuss currently available sprayer PWM technologies with an overview of key benefits, applying label requirements and the importance of boom height control. We will also discuss the future of this technology with recent product releases and other technologies this enables.

  • 29. Electrocuting weeds and grinding up weed seeds: Insight into some non-conventional weed management tools for use in our conventionally minded agricultural systems (1 PM)

    Kevin Bradley, professor, Plant Sciences and state extension weed specialist, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
    Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    Albert Einstein said that doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity. Throughout my entire career, I have watched waterhemp develop resistance to each and every “next best solution” herbicide that has come onto the market, and the result is that we now have very few viable herbicide options left for the control of this species. No doubt the future of waterhemp management will still involve herbicides, but it’s clear we need a new approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our impressions of two “new” technologies that we have evaluated over the past several seasons; the Seed Terminator and the Weed Zapper. Both of these implements are designed to prevent waterhemp seed from ever returning to the soil. Currently, adoption rates of both of these implements are essentially zero in conventional U.S. agriculture, but you might find these non-conventional weed management tools worth a second look.

  • 33. Corn rootworm management update (1 PM)

    Erin Hodgson, professor and extension entomologist, Entomology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
    Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    During the past decade, there are been a number of challenges in the management of corn rootworm, including the development of resistance, which has arisen in large part because of prophylactic management. This presentation will review scouting tips and economic thresholds, and focus on research-based management strategies for more sustainable corn rootworm suppression.

  • 37. Tar spot of corn: A new and emerging disease in the Midwest (1 PM)

    Darcy Telenko, assistant professor, Botany and Plant Pathology and field crop extension pathologist, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
    Tuesday, February 2, 2021 at 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM CST
    Tar spot of corn, caused by Phyllachora maydis, is a new and emerging disease in Midwest. In 2018 and 2019, it had a significant yield impact on corn production in northern Indiana. The 2018 tar spot epidemic was the first time yield losses were documented in the U.S. Prior to this epidemic; no field research had been done in North American for tar spot management. A summary of our experiences in Indiana will be presented as we continue to improve our understanding of this new disease in corn.

  • 51. Saving money and monarchs: Stacking environmental benefits on non-cropland (1 PM)

    Steven Bradbury, professor, Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Adam Janke, Assistant Professor, ISU; John Tyndall, Associate Professor, ISU
    On-demand only. Release date to be announced.
    Establishing pollinator habitat can support recovery of the monarch butterfly, a species of conservation concern, as well as native bees, and song birds that use Iowa’s countryside. Idled yards, barn lots, or other mowed areas are ideal spots to introduce a diversity of native grasses and wildflowers that bloom from spring through the fall. Research at Iowa State recently determined establishing and maintaining monarch habitat in these areas is appreciatively less expensive than maintaining mowed grass, thus saving the monarch and money on the same acres.