Workshop listing for 2014

Descriptions of all workshops appear below. Some workshops that are part of special symposia may be listed twice. Workshops are listed under the CCA category that they qualify for.

You will be asked to select your workshops during the registration process. Please download and print the program booklet containing the workshop listings, schedule, grid worksheet and registration form.

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Crop management

1. Crop weather outlook 2015. Elwynn Taylor, Agronomy, Iowa State University. The Midwest suffered the first drought since 1988 during 2012. Chances are that drought opened a period of crop weather that will have greater variability (a mixture of very good and very bad years) than we have seen since before 1996. We will cover the "Why" and "How" of managing the "Weather Risk" to farming. (1 CM) – Session M - Thurs, 2:00 pm and Session N - Thurs, 3:00 pm.

2. Weather-based decision tools. Chad Hart, Economics, Iowa State University. This presentation will highlight several decision tools created to incorporate agronomic, climatic, and economic data into farming decisions. The tools are targeted at crop variety selection, crop timing, equipment, and marketing needs. (1 CM) – Session F - Wed, 3:10 pm and Session G - Wed, 4:10 pm.

3. Big Data and the farm: Legal tools for protecting your information. Shannon L. Ferrell, Agricultural Economics, Oklahoma State University. "Big data" is a hot topic in agriculture. The promised benefits to the producer's bottom line can be huge, but what are the risks involved in sharing your farm data? This presentation will help producers maximize the rewards while minimizing the risks of data sharing arrangements. (1 CM) – Session D - Wed, 1:00 pm and Session E - Wed, 2:00 pm.

4. Value and opportunities in big data. Matt Darr, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University. Recently, advances in machine data availability, improved climate modeling and new technologies, including high-resolution crop imagery, have enabled new industries around the concept of Big Data, which is aimed at helping producers better navigate their annual decision process, resulting in more on- farm productivity and profitability. This presentation will aim directly at quantifying the value of data- empowered decisions, discuss the current market landscape around data services, and address data privacy and data partnerships. (1 CM) – Session H - Thurs, 8:00 am and Session I - Thurs, 9:00 am.

5. The highs and lows of crop marketing. Chad Hart, Economics, Iowa State University. We will discuss the current situation and forward outlook for the corn and soybean markets, exploring the links among large crop supplies, a growing livestock industry, global trade issues, and biofuel forecasts. (1 CM) – Session B - Wed, 10:00 am and Session C - Wed, 11:00 am.

6. New Farm Bill, new safety net. Alejandro Plastina, Economics, Iowa State University. Farmland owners and operators will be making a series of decisions over the next few months that will affect their safety net for the entire life of the 2014 Farm Bill. Join us for a discussion of the available tools to inform those decisions. (1 CM) – Session L - Thurs, 1:00 pm and Session N - Thurs, 3:00 pm.

7. Production cost budgets for perennial grass systems. Chad Hart, Economics, Iowa State University. Under the CenUSA biofuel grant, research has led a new variety of grass for biofuel production. This presentation will outline the cost for perennial grass production and compare it to alternative crops. (1 CM) – Session J - Thurs, 10:10 am and Session K - Thurs, 11:10 am.

8. Grain quality and handling for the 2014 crop. Charles Hurburgh, Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University. [no description provided] (1 CM) – Session A - Wed, 9:00 am and Session C - Wed, 11:00 am.

9. Energy costs for grain drying and field operations. Mark Hanna and Dana Schweitzer, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University. Managing energy costs are an easy way to improve profitability without adversely affecting production. Compare grain drying and tractor fuel energy with measurements from Iowa State University Farm operations. Evaluate techniques to reduce energy expenditures. (1 CM) – Session B - Wed, 10:00 am and Session C - Wed, 11:00 am.

10. Continuous improvement in the areas of crop, nutrient, pest and soil and water management. Patrick Reeg, On-Farm Network, Iowa Soybean Association. Over the last 15 years, the Iowa Soybean Association’s On-Farm Network® has developed and adopted a variety of tools and methodologies to continuously improve efficiency and profitability of environmentally sound cropping systems. Today we will show the process used by participants utilizing precision ag tools and technologies to collect data on the farm. The information collected also allows farmers the ability to make informed decisions by examining validated results on products and management practices available in the on-line database of individual replicated strip trials. (1 CM) – Session A - Wed, 9:00 am and Session B - Wed, 10:00 am.

11. Increasing profitability in soybean production by optimizing planting rates. Tristan Mueller, On-Farm Network, Iowa Soybean Association. Farmers are interested in better managing seeding rates within soybean fields to increase productivity and economic returns. The Iowa Soybean Association’s On-Farm Network® has conducted over 100 on-farm replicated strip trials with different soybean planting rates. The results were used to identify practices such as planting date and row spacing; soil and topography information including relative elevation, slope and drainage class at which higher or lower planting rates produced economic yield responses. (1 CM) – Session J - Thurs, 10:10 am and Session K - Thurs, 11:10 am.

12. The benefits of understanding GMOs. Don Lee, Agronomy and Horticulture, University of Nebraska- Lincoln. People have opinions about the use of GMOs in our food and health system. Opinion can be based on science, economics, safety or emotion. This talk entertains the argument that understanding GMOs benefits everyone. (1 CM) – Session M - Thurs, 2:00 pm and Session N - Thurs, 3:00 pm.

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Pest management

13. Federal pesticide regulatory update: Moving to a national framework with local adaptations? Steve Bradbury, Entomology, Iowa State University. Recent US EPA pesticide regulations are establishing national performance expectations, with varying degrees of implementation flexibility at the state/local level. For example, EPA decisions concerning water quality, pollinator, and endangered species protection, and pesticide resistance management, create opportunities for designing and specifying local pesticide use requirements consistent with conditions specified in Federal pesticide registrations. The presentation will highlight the roles that IPM and site-specific pest management decisions play in this evolving paradigm. (1 PM) – Session F - Wed, 3:10 pm and Session G - Wed, 4:10 pm.

14. Using pesticide stewardship to minimize off-target exposures. Gretchen Paluch, Pesticide Bureau, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. Pesticide stewardship is an integral part of a safe and successful pest management program. Approaches to implementing drift reduction strategies and minimizing off-target exposures discussed. (1 PM) – Session H - Thurs, 8:00 am and Session I - Thurs, 9:00 am.

15. Importance of protecting pollinators for our food supply. Gary Reuter, Entomology, University of Minnesota. (1 PM) – Session D - Wed, 1:00 pm and Session E - Wed, 2:00 pm.

16. Biology, distribution and management of the brown marmorated stink bug. Erin Hodgson, Entomology, Iowa State University. Brown marmorated stink bug is a new invasive species in Iowa. This bug has a wide host range and the potential to negatively impact corn and soybean yield. The discussion will include biology and management recommendations for this pest. (1 PM) – Session H - Thurs, 8:00 am and Session I - Thurs, 9:00 am.

17. Weed management update 2015. Micheal D.K. Owen, Agronomy, Iowa State University. The topics that will be discussed include problems experienced in 2014 from herbicide carryover, crop injury issues, and herbicide drift. The new genetically engineered crops with herbicide resistance will be reviewed and the utility of herbicide pre-mixtures for herbicide resistant weed management evaluated. (1 PM) – Session A - Wed, 9:00 am and Session B - Wed, 10:00 am.

18. Weed management considerations for incorporating cover crops into corn and soybean production. Bob Hartzler, Agronomy, Iowa State University. Can cover crops reduce our reliance on herbicides for managing weeds? The contribution of cover crops in weed suppression and the potential impact of herbicides on cover crop establishment will be discussed. (1 PM) – Session L - Thurs, 1:00 pm and Session M - Thurs, 2:00 pm.

19. Fungicide resistance in field crops. Daren Mueller, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University. This presentation will provide an overview of fungicide resistance in field crops. (1 PM) – Session J - Thurs, 10:10 am and Session K - Thurs, 11:10 am.

20. Sudden death syndrome: Research update. Daren Mueller, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University. This presentation will provide an update on research conducted on sudden death syndrome. This includes some research on some seed treatments that will be available soon. (1 PM) – Session L - Thurs, 1:00 pm and Session N - Thurs, 3:00 pm.

21. Fine tuning fungicide decisions in Iowa. Warren Pierson, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University. This presentation will discuss ongoing fungicide trials in Iowa that determine the effects of fungicides on disease severity and yield on soybeans. Furthermore data on the effect of fungicides on hail- damaged corn and soybean will be shared. Also, a summary of fungicide applications in furrow and early in the season (V5-V7) on soybean and corn will be discussed. (1 PM) – Session D - Wed, 1:00 pm and Session E - Wed, 2:00 pm.

22. Insights into the Diaporthe/Phomopsis complex that causes pod and stem blight, Northern stem canker and and Phomopsis seed decay of soybeans in the United States. Febina Mathew, Plant Sciences, South Dakota State University. The Diaporthe/Phomopsis complex is widely distributed and causes more losses in soybean than any other single fungal pathogen. The three most important diseases in the Midwest are: pod and stem blight (Diaporthe sojae); Northern stem canker and dieback (Diaporthe caulivora); and Phomopsis seed decay (Diaporthe longicolla). These fungi can also be involved in the root rot complex of soybeans. Proper identification of these diseases is critical for management decisions. (1 PM) – Session F - Wed, 3:10 pm and Session G - Wed, 4:10 pm.

23. Research insights in Goss's wilt and leaf blight. Alison Robertson, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University. Goss's wilt and leaf blight have re-emerged as an economically important disease of corn in the U.S. This presentation will present data from field and laboratory trials that have been done over the past three years at Iowa State University. This research has increased our understanding of the biology of this pathosystem. (1 PM) – Session H - Thurs, 8:00 am and Session I - Thurs, 9:00 am.

24. Corn diseases of 2014: Northern corn leaf blight, Physoderma brown spot, ear and stalk rots. Alison Robertson, Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University. 2014 will most certainly be remembered as the year of Northern corn leaf blight. Other diseases that were prevalent include Physoderma brown spot and stalk rot, as well as stalk rots in general. This presentation will describe the biology of each disease and discuss management options for next year. (1 PM) – Session B - Wed, 10:00 am and Session C - Wed, 11:00 am.

 

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Nutrient management

25. Fertilizer situation and outlook. David Asbridge, President, NPK Fertilizer Advisory Service, Inc.. The fertilizer market has been and continues to be undergoing an unprecedented period of volatility. This session will discuss what is causing the volatility and what the fertilizer market is expected to do over the next few months. (1 NM) – Session A - Wed, 9:00 am and Session C - Wed, 11:00 am.

26. Corn nitrogen rate management: Facts, concepts, and mother nature. John Sawyer, Agronomy, Iowa State University. The Maximum Return to Nitrogen (MRTN) approach (Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator) is used for making nitrogen rate recommendations in Iowa for corn production. This approach uses corn and nitrogen prices, along with a large nitrogen response trial database, to provide a most profitable economic rate. However, Mother Nature can affect nitrogen response, which becomes especially worrisome with high precipitation and associated greater than normal losses. This session will cover corn nitrogen use facts and concepts of rate determination, with additional emphasis for managing applications and rates in years with high precipitation. (1 NM) – Session F - Wed, 3:10 pm and Session G - Wed, 4:10 pm.

27. Corn and soybean yield response to micronutrient fertilization. Antonio P. Mallarino, Agronomy, Iowa State University. Farmers and crop consultants have been asking many questions about corn and soybean micronutrients fertilization needs. This presentation summarizes results of more than 100 trials conducted on farmers' fields or research farms from 2012 to 2014 with fertilization to the soil or foliage. (1 NM) – Session D - Wed, 1:00 pm and Session E - Wed, 2:00 pm.

28. Using precision agriculture technologies for phosphorus, potassium, and lime management with lower grain prices and to improve water quality. Antonio P. Mallarino, Agronomy, Iowa State University. With lower grain prices, farmers may decide to reduce nutrient application rates across an entire field, which often times will not be the most profitable decision. This presentation will review how precision agriculture technologies, such as variable rate application, can and often should be used to increase profits from nutrient use and at the same time reduce the risk of nutrient losses to water resources (1 NM) – Session J - Thurs, 10:10 am and Session K - Thurs, 11:10 am.

29. Incorporating risk into 4R nutrient management decisions. Peter Kyveryga, Analytics, Iowa Soybean Association. Because of common economic volatility, large variability in weather and within field soil properties, it is important to quantify the risk in nitrogen (N) management. The results of more than 3500 on- farm evaluations conducted by farmers during the last 8 years across Iowa were used to quantify the agronomic risk for a specific field to have deficient or excessive corn N status for management practices with different timing, forms, and rates of N applications under different scenarios of early-season rainfall in Iowa. The feedback-based system allows incorporating the risk into nutrient or manure management planning to make better data-driven fertilizer decisions. (1 NM) – Session L - Thurs, 1:00 pm and Session M - Thurs, 2:00 pm.

 

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Soil and water management

30. CSR2: Understanding Iowa's new Corn Suitability Rating. Lee Burras, Agronomy, Iowa State University. The Corn Suitability Rating (CSR) has been a valuable tool for objectively evaluating land productivity in Iowa. This presentation will look at how the CSR2 is calculated, the objectives of the rating, highlight how the new version differs from the previous and provide an update on availability and adoption. (1 SW) – Session J - Thurs, 10:10 am and Session K - Thurs, 11:10 am.

31. Improving water quality through agribusiness partnerships. Jamie Benning, Water Quality Program Manager, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Partnerships are essential in implementing the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy. Learn how agribusinesses around the state are partnering with watershed projects to increase the use of practices that improve water quality. (1 SW) – Session A - Wed, 9:00 am and Session B - Wed, 10:00 am.

32. Strip-tillage successes and watch-outs based on soil type, soil drainage, and climate. Mahdi Al-Kaisi, Agronomy, Iowa State University. This presentation will address the concept of strip-tillage as compared to other tillage systems that are used in corn and soybean production. It will provide a background and understanding of the strip-tillage system. More specifically, this presentation will cover considerations of choosing any tillage systems including strip-tillage, the concept of strip-tillage, tillage performance under different soil and climate conditions, site-specific adoption of strip-tillage, impact of tillage systems on soil quality, and challenges and benefits of strip-tillage system. (1 SW) – Session D - Wed, 1:00 pm and Session E - Wed, 2:00 pm.

33. Cover crops,bioreactors, and wetlands for nitrate reduction. Matt Helmers, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University. Reducing downstream nitrate-nitrogen export is of increasing importance. Cover crops, bioreactors, and wetlands are some of the most promising practices for reducing nitrate-N export. This presentation will discuss the performance of these practices under Iowa conditions. (1 SW) – Session H - Thurs, 8:00 am and Session I - Thurs, 9:00 am.

34. Nutrient Management PLUS with Perennial Grass STRIPS. Matt Liebman, Agronomy, Iowa State University; Tim Youngquist, Agronomy, Iowa State University; Ken Moore, Agronomy, Iowa State University; Jill Euken, Bioeconomy Institute, Iowa State University. Matt Liebman and Tim Youngquist will share research results from the Iowa STRIPS project, which established small strips of perennial grasses in 2007 in experimental watersheds containing corn and soybean crops. The strips reduced exports of soil, phosphorus, and nitrogen by 95%, 90%, and 84%, respectively, and are now being implemented on commercial farms. Ken Moore and Jill Euken will share information about a new variety of switchgrass that has been bred for increased yields and improved performance for processing into biofuels. They will also share new resources available that describe best practices for establishing and maintaining switchgrass in Iowa. (1 SW) – Session F - Wed, 3:10 pm and Session G - Wed, 4:10 pm.

 

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Pesticide applicator training

35. Seed Treatment Continuing Instructional Course. Betsy Buffington, Entomology, Iowa State University. The Seed Treatment CIC will provide continuing instructional credit for commercial pesticide applicators certified in categories 4 and 10. Topics to be covered include pests, pest management, and pesticide stewardship. To receive recertification, applicators must also attend at least one pest management session from workshops 13, 15, 20, 22 in addition to this session.
(1 PM) – Session K - Thurs, 11:10 am and Session L - Thurs, 1:00 pm.

36. Commercial Ag Weed, Insect, and Disease Management Continuing Instructional Course. Kristine Schaefer, Pest Management and the Environment, Iowa State University. The Commercial Ag Weed, Insect and Disease Management CIC program will provide continuing instructional credit for commercial pesticide applicators certified in categories 1A, 1B, 1C, and 10. Some of the topics covered include water quality protection measures for agriculture, Iowa right-of-way concerns, diagnosing herbicide injury, and pollinator protection. To receive recertification, applicators must also attend a pest management session for each of the subcategories they are certified in addition to this session. (1 PM) – Session M - Thurs, 2:00 pm and Session N - Thurs, 3:00 pm.
Additional workshop options:

  • 1A - 13, 14, 17 or 18
  • 1B - 13, 14, 15 or 16
  • 1C - 13, 14, 19 – 24

 

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