Soil and Water Management

Printable conference program

  • 31. Streambanks, floodplains, and gullies: Addressing erosion through forestry in agricultural landscapes (1.0 SW)

    William Beck, assistant professor and Extension forestry specialist, Natural Resource and Ecology Management, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Practical, forestry-based solutions for agricultural producers to address streambank, floodplain, and gully erosion will be discussed. In addition to erosion control, these practices often provide sustainable income and recreational value to landowners.
    Session D - Wednesday, 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
    Session E - Wednesday, 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM

  • 32. Overview of long-term tillage research: Yield, economic returns, and soil carbon nexus (1.0 SW)

    Mahdi Al-Kaisi, professor and Extension soil and water management specialist, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    This presentation will summarize the results long-term tillage and crop rotation research conducted in Iowa over the past decade at various locations representing different soil and climate conditions. The purpose is to highlight the changes soil management practices caused to productivity of both corn and soybean, economic return, and change to soil carbon relationships.
    Session J - Thursday, 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
    Session K - Thursday, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

  • 33. Machine traffic-induced soil compaction and its impacts on soil physical properties and crop yield (1.0 SW)

    Mehari Tekeste, assistant professor, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Mark Hanna, Extension agricultural engineer, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Soil compaction can have significant negative impact on water infiltration, root development, and crop yield. Numerous studies have shown that vehicle size with an axle load of 11 tons/axle or higher can create subsoil compaction to a depth of 20 to 24 in. The effect of machine induced soil compaction on soil physical properties (soil bulk density and soil cone index) and crop yields was investigated in central Iowa. Depending on the intensity of soil trafficking and soil damage, the crop yield due to soil compaction was found to vary 3% to 25% relative to control plots. Soil bulk density and soil cone index showed significantly higher soil compaction on machine trafficked that the untrafficked plots.
    Session J - Thursday, 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
    Session K - Thursday, 11:10 AM - 12:00 PM

  • 34. Burying stuff to get the scoop on your soil’s health (1.0 SW)

    Marshall McDaniel, assistant professor, soil-plant interactions, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Biological soil health measurements are all the rage. The costs to analyze your soils at commercial labs ranges between $50 to greater than $100 per sample. This workshop will discuss the reliability and benefits of decomposing inexpensive, household items as a ‘do-it-yourself’ alternative to these traditional biological soil health tests.
    Session L - Thursday, 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
    Session N - Thursday, 3:00 PM - 3:50 PM

  • 35. Decision tools for conservation systems success (1.0 SW)

    Jamie Benning, Extension water quality program manager, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Mark Licht, assistant professor and Extension cropping systems specialist, Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Matthew Helmers, professor and Extension agricultural engineer, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Participants will review and discuss decision support tools for successful implementation of in-field, edge-of-field nitrate reduction, and extended rotation conservation practices. Participants will have the opportunity to apply the tools using scenarios from different regions of Iowa.
    Session A - Wednesday, 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
    Session C - Wednesday, 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

  • 36. Trade-offs between increasing row crop acres and meeting the water quality goals of the Nutrient Reduction Strategy (1.0 SW)

    Laurie Nowatzke, measurement coordinator, Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Kay Stefanik, assistant director, Iowa Nutrient Research Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    In the last decade, agricultural land in Iowa has continued to experience increases in corn and soybean acres coupled with decreases in acres of extended rotations, perennials, and pasture. These changes in land use have had negative effects on nitrogen and phosphorus losses, presenting a serious challenge for conservation efforts that aim to reduce nutrient loss through the adoption of in-field and edge- of-field practices like cover crops, wetlands, and bioreactors. This session will describe changes in Iowa’s agricultural land use over the last few decades and will explore the potential trade-offs between increasing row crop acres and implementing in-field and edge-of-field practices. For instance, how many bioreactors, wetlands and cover crops acres are needed to counteract the impacts of decreasing extended rotations and pasture? What are the estimated costs of these options? The session will take a quantitative approach to displaying these trade-offs and will facilitate a discussion on the challenges that agricultural land use change presents for Iowa’s water quality improvement efforts.
    Session F - Wednesday, 3:10 PM - 4:00 PM
    Session G - Wednesday, 4:10 PM - 5:00 PM

  • 37. Stacking of in-field and edge-of-field practices for nitrate-N reduction (1.0 SW)

    Matthew Helmers, professor and Extension agricultural engineer, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Reducing downstream nitrate-N delivery will require a combination of in-field and edge-of-field practices. This presentation will highlight the potential to stack practices to reach N reduction goals and what other benefits might be provided by these practices.
    Session H - Thursday, 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM
    Session I - Thursday, 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM